SUMMER SESSION I (5/25/21-7/1/21)

 

CSE 003 INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING PART A, MTWR 12:00-1:35 (Remote Synchronous),  Professor Kallie Ziltz

Covers the same material as the first half of CSE 007. Designed to allow more class and laboratory time for each topic. No prior programming experience needed. Cannot be taken by students who have completed CSE 007.


CSE 017 PROGRAMMING AND DATA STRUCTURES, MTWR 12:00-1:35 (Remote Synchronous), Professor Arielle Carr

This course is a programming-intensive exploration of software design concepts and implementation techniques. It builds on the student's existing knowledge of fundamental programming. Topics include object-oriented software design, problem-solving strategies, algorithm development, and classic data structures. Prerequisite: CSE 004 or CSE 007 or (CSE 002 and (CSE 001 or CSE 012 or ENGR 010))


CSE 140 FOUNDATIONS OF DISCRETE STRUCTURES & ALGORITHMS, MTWR 10:00-11:35 (Remote Synchronous), Professor Ahmed Hassan

Basic representations used in algorithms: propositional and predicate logic, set operations and functions, relations and their representations, matrices and their representations, graphs and their representations, trees and their representations. Basic formalizations for proving algorithm correctness: logical consequences, induction, structural induction. Basic formalizations for algorithm analysis: counting, pigeonhole principle, permutations. Prerequisites: (MATH 021 or MATH 031 or MATH 051 or MATH 076) and CSE 017 (co-requisite).


CSE 202 COMPUTER ORGANIZATION AND ARCHITECTURE, MTWR 10:00-11:35(Remote Synchronous), Professor Mark Erle

Interaction between low-level computer architectural properties and high-level program behaviors: instruction set design; digital logics and assembly language; processor organization; the memory hierarchy; multicore and GPU architectures; and processor interrupt/exception models.  Credit will not be given for both CSE 201 and CSE 202. Prerequisite: CSE 17


CSE 271 PROGRAMMING IN THE C AND UNIX ENVIRONMENT, MTWR 2:00-3:35 (Remote Synchronous), Professor Mark Erle

Programming in Unix and Windows - Students learn Unix and Windows operating system fundamentals including features, organization, and process management. Emphasis is placed on Unix's BASh and Window's PowerShell scripting languages. Tools commonly available with these operating systems, such as those for editing, compiling, debugging, scheduling jobs, etc., are also explored. Students should expect to write a variety of small programming assignments. Prerequisite: CSE 109


 

SUMMER SESSION II (7/6/21-8/12/21)

 

CSE 004 INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING PART B, MTWR 12:00-1:35 (Remote Synchronous),  Professor Kallie Ziltz

Covers the same material as the second half of CSE 007. Designed to allow more class and laboratory time for each topic. Cannot be taken by students who have completed CSE 007.


CSE 109 SYSTEMS SOFTWARE, (Remote Asynchronous) Professor Corey Montella

Advanced programming and data structures, including dynamic structures, memory allocation, data organization, symbol tables, hash tables, B-trees, data files. Object-oriented design and implementation of simple assemblers, loaders, interpreters, compilers and translators. Practical methods for implementing medium-scale programs. Prerequisite: CSE 17


CSE 298 FOUNDATIONS OF ROBOTICS (Remote Asynchronous), Professor Corey Montella

Introduces students to the field of robotics, covering foundational mathematics and physics as well as important algorithms and tools. Topics include simulation, kinematics, control, machine learning, and probabilistic inference. The mathematical basis of each area will be covered, followed by practical application to common robotics tasks. This course is designed to be taught remotely using simulated robot platforms and sensors. Pre-requisites:  CSE 004 OR CSE 007 OR (CSE 002 AND (CSE 001OR CSE 012 OR ENGR 010 ) )


NOTE: This listing represents our current plan for the semester in question. Course offerings and class times are occasionally subject to change for reasons beyond our control.